THE BEST OF LOOKS UNFAMILIAR 06 - TOP CAT WILL ALWAYS BE BOSS CAT

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to.

This is a collection of highlights from shows thirty one to thirty six, featuring Justin Lewis on Neither Fish Nor Flesh by Terence Trent D’Arby, Mark Thompson on Libby’s Moonshine, Stephen Brotherstone and Dave Lawrence on The Lone Ranger by Quantum Jump, Stephen O’Brien on Old Fashioned Christmas by Anne Charleston and Ian Smith, Garreth F. Hirons on The Ghosts Of Oxford Street, Vikki Gregorich and Jeff Lewis on The Secret Cabaret, Emma Burnell on Melody Radio and Paul Cornell on Terry Wogan’s insistence on playing records that resolutely refused to become hits. Along the way we’ll be finding out what happens when you continually ask a radio station that doesn’t have Ghostbusters to play Ghostbusters, revisiting the forgotten link between Rupert And The Frog Song and Cannibal Holocaust, debating the identity of ‘soft lad who stood on a pole’, celebrating the career of ‘DJ Ron’, revealing how to avoid getting mistaken for an extra on Neighbours, singing a medley of all two and a half records owned by Radio Merseyside, and trying not to think about what ‘Dog Of Finland’ might entail. Plus there’s some little-heard extra bits of chat with Emma, Stephen and Mark as well as something you might not have heard before – Tim on Perfect Night In talking to Neil Perryman about the BBC edits of The Monkees

You can find more editions of Looks Unfamiliar at http://timworthington.org/.

LOOKS UNFAMILIAR THE LARKS ASCENDING EXTRA: "YOU CAN'T EXACTLY WASH THE DISHES TO YOU SUFFER BY NAPALM DEATH"

The Larks Ascending is a new book by Tim Worthington looking at the history of Comedy on BBC Radio 3. In this special extra edition of Looks Unfamiliar, Tim talks to Garreth F. Hirons about the book and some of the programmes covered in it, including the infamous ‘Piotr Zak’ hoax, David Renwick and Andrew Marshall’s academic broadcasting parody The Half-Open University, left-wing theatre troupe sitcom Blood And Bruises, The National Theatre Of Brent’s ‘History of mankind from the First Amoeba to the Second World War’ All The World’s A Globe, Chris Morris chatting to Peter Cook in Why Bother?, and Armando Iannucci’s interval talk on how to Use Your Ears. We’ll also be appreciating some quality drumming, starting a Mexican Wave with Dr. Hans Keller, and definitely not enrolling on Professor Alan Alanson’s Magic Brain Programme (Guaranteed Not To Work!).

You can find more editions of Looks Unfamiliar at http://timworthington.org/

You can get The Larks Ascending in paperback here and from the Kindle Store hereFun At One, Tim’s previous book looking at comedy on BBC Radio 1 (including lots more about Chris Morris and Armando Iannucci), is available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.

You can hear Garreth as a guest on Looks Unfamiliar here and here, and in a Christmas Extra looking at some of Channel 4’s decidedly odd Christmas Day programming here. There’s more on forgotten radio comedy in the editions of Looks Unfamiliar with Jacqueline Rayner here and Justin Lewis here.

LOOKS UNFAMILIAR CHRISTMAS ON 4 EXTRA: "I DON'T WANT TO GET ALL SEPIA TINTED HERE"

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to. Joining Tim for a special yuletide edition is writer and musician Garreth F. Hirons, who’s here to talk about Channel 4’s 1991 Christmas Day oddity The Ghosts Of Oxford Street, a musical history-based documentary featuring Malcolm McLaren, Happy Mondays, The Pogues, Kirsty MacColl, Nick Cotton from EastEnders and many other equally unlikely names. There’s also room for a look at some of Channel 4’s other peculiar Christmas Day offerings over the years, as well as finding out who was Q Magazine’s House Diva Of Choice, celebrating the career of ‘DJ Ron’, defining what constitutes a ‘New Console Christmas’, and discussing why Tom Jones would not have been a good choice for a Doctor Who assistant.

You can find more editions of Looks Unfamiliar at http://timworthington.org/

You can find Garreth’s previous appearances on Looks Unfamiliar here and here. Garreth’s podcast Retrospecticus – The Simpsons And Modern History Together At Last can be found here. and on Twitter at @_Retrospecticus. You can also find his blog Atomic Sourpuss here.

There’s more about Channel 4’s peculiar approach to Christmas Day broadcasting in Emma Burnell’s second appearance on Looks Unfamiliar, which you can find here.

Tim’s book Higher Than The Sun, the story of Screamadelica by Primal Scream, Loveless by My Bloody Valentine, Bandwagonesque by Teenage Fanclub and Foxbase Alpha by Saint Etienne – and how Creation Records took on the world and almost won – is available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.

LOOKS UNFAMILIAR MOVIE DOUBLE BILL EXTRA: "A GIANT RAYMOND BURR THE SIZE OF GODZILLA"

Grab some popcorn and take a seat for a Double Bill of monster movie mayhem from the archives! First up, we're off to the video shop with Tim Worthington and Ben Baker for a chat about 'Video Nasties', then grab your 3D glasses and head for the Drive-In as Garreth F. Hirons tells us all about the old-skool city-smashing antics of Godzilla. Along the way we'll be meeting the Japanese Donovan, queueing up behind Phil Cool to rent Zombie Creeping Flesh, and getting thoroughly fed up of the endless 'affair with an octopus' storylines on EastEnders.

THE BEST OF LOOKS UNFAMILIAR 04 - THE REAL BOWIE SAYS TO THE IMAGINED BOWIE

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to. This is a collection of highlights from shows nineteen to twenty four, featuring Paul Kirkley on The Kids From Fame Again, Garreth F. Hirons on Sweet 75, Darrell Maclaine on The Brennan JB7, James Gent on When The Wind Blows by David Bowie, Ros Ballinger on Microsoft Explorapedia, and Jonny Morris on Jesta Giggle by The Barron Knights. Along the way we’ll be finding out why The Barron Knights should have covered T.V.O.D., where the whistling from Never Let Me Down was ‘borrowed’ from, which CDs you should never trust your car with, and which former member of Nirvana really loves accordions. Plus there’s also something you may not have heard before – Tim on Betamax Video Club talking about Absolute Beginners, and an extra downhill slaloming surprise at the end…

You can get TIm’s new book, Can’t Help Thinking About Me, here.

024 - GARRETH F. HIRONS - I BACKED THE BETAMAX OF NIRVANA SPINOFFS

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to.

Joining Tim for a second time is musician and writer Garreth F. Hirons, who’s getting puzzled looks whenever he mentions The Yellow Album by The Simpsons, the Frankie Goes To Hollywood computer game, post-Nirvana outfit Sweet 75, sitcom Linc’s, the Transformers ‘Action Masters’ range, The Way Of The Tiger gaming books, and high-concept soft drink Quatro. Along the way we’ll be finding out why Ian Amblin took exception to E.T.’s Rugby League, how marketable a Richard Stilgoe Action Figure would be, the correct angle for Ped Gill’s head, and more than you would ever rationally want to know about what happened on 24th November 1998. Plus there’s an update on the Piers Morgan/Monster Munch debacle!

You can find more editions of Looks Unfamiliar here.

You can find Garreth’s previous appearance on Looks Unfamiliar – with the origins of the Piers Morgan Monster Munch outrage and some chat about ZX Spectrum game Saboteur – here and his own podcast Retrospecticus: The Simpsons And Modern History – Together At Last! here (which you can also find on Twitter at @_Retrospecticus). There’s also some festive chatter with Garreth about Malcolm McLaren’s early nineties oddity The Ghosts Of Oxford Street here.

You can find more chatter about unlikely ZX Spectrum games in other editions of Looks Unfamiliar with Phil Catterall on Platoon here, Stephen Brotherstone and Dave Lawrence on Deus Ex Machina here, Michael Livesley on Clumsy Colin Action Biker here and Emma Burnell on The Lords Of Midnight here. There’s also more about forgotten soft drinks – this time Quosh Tropical – in the edition with Jacqueline Rayner which you can find here.

If you’ve enjoyed this, you’ll enjoy Tim’s book Can’t Help Thinking About Me – including a big feature about how much he hated Nirvana and preferred those nice boys from Blur – which is available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.

Garreth also appears in The Best Of Looks Unfamiliar alongside Ros Ballinger, Jonny Morris, Darrell Maclaine, James Gent and Paul Kirkley, which you can find here.

002 - GARRETH F. HIRONS - PIERS MORGAN, I WANT MY SIZZLIN' BACON BACK

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to.

Joining Tim this time is writer and musician Garreth F. Hirons, who tells us about his troubling memories of indie band The Bigger The God, unlikeable action figure range Food Fighters, ZX Spectrum game Saboteur, short-lived wrestling sensation The Triangle Of Terror, Sizzlin’ Bacon Flavour Monster Munch, and BBC3 sitcom Fun At The Funeral Parlour. Along the way we’ll also be finding out why professional wrestlers should never attempt topical satire, what caused ZX Spectrum owners to live in fear of Ian Durell, and how Piers Morgan caused the decline of the maize-based snack industry.

You can find more editions of Looks Unfamiliar here.

You can find Garreth’s previous appearance on Looks Unfamiliar – with more on obscure ZX Spectrum games and the origins of the Piers Morgan Monster Munch outrage – here and his own podcast Retrospecticus: The Simpsons And Modern History – Together At Last! here (and follow them on Twitter at @_Retrospecticus). There’s also some festive chatter with Garreth about Malcolm McLaren’s early nineties oddity The Ghosts Of Oxford Street here, and he took over as guest host for a special interviewing me about The Larks Ascending and comedy on BBC Radio 3 which you can find here.

You can find more recollections of ill-advised ZX Spectrum games in other editions of Looks Unfamiliar with Emma Burnell on The Lords Of Midnight here, Phil Catterall on Platoon here, Michael Livesley on Clumsy Colin Action Biker here, Stephen Brotherstone and Dave Lawrence on Deus Ex Machina here and Jem Roberts on Dizzy here. There’s also a chat with Mark Thompson about Crash ZX Spectrum magazine here.

If you’ve enjoyed this, you’ll enjoy Tim’s book Can’t Help Thinking About Me, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.

Garreth also features in The Best Of Looks Unfamiliar alongside Emma Burnell, Ben Baker, Phil Catterall, Stephen O’Brien and Mark Thompson, which you can find here.