THE BEST OF LOOKS UNFAMILIAR 06 - TOP CAT WILL ALWAYS BE BOSS CAT

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to.

This is a collection of highlights from shows thirty one to thirty six, featuring Justin Lewis on Neither Fish Nor Flesh by Terence Trent D’Arby, Mark Thompson on Libby’s Moonshine, Stephen Brotherstone and Dave Lawrence on The Lone Ranger by Quantum Jump, Stephen O’Brien on Old Fashioned Christmas by Anne Charleston and Ian Smith, Garreth F. Hirons on The Ghosts Of Oxford Street, Vikki Gregorich and Jeff Lewis on The Secret Cabaret, Emma Burnell on Melody Radio and Paul Cornell on Terry Wogan’s insistence on playing records that resolutely refused to become hits. Along the way we’ll be finding out what happens when you continually ask a radio station that doesn’t have Ghostbusters to play Ghostbusters, revisiting the forgotten link between Rupert And The Frog Song and Cannibal Holocaust, debating the identity of ‘soft lad who stood on a pole’, celebrating the career of ‘DJ Ron’, revealing how to avoid getting mistaken for an extra on Neighbours, singing a medley of all two and a half records owned by Radio Merseyside, and trying not to think about what ‘Dog Of Finland’ might entail. Plus there’s some little-heard extra bits of chat with Emma, Stephen and Mark as well as something you might not have heard before – Tim on Perfect Night In talking to Neil Perryman about the BBC edits of The Monkees

You can find more editions of Looks Unfamiliar at http://timworthington.org/.

031 - MARK THOMPSON - LIBBY'S DIFFICULT SECOND CARTON DRINK

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to. Joining Tim this time is political commentator Mark Thompson, who’s offering his polling predictions for the chances of people remembering hillbilly-themed soft drink Moonshine, the A. Mazing Monsters books, L!ve TV’s AgonyBeing Erica, Hawkeye Collins And Amy Adams, and Channel 5 sketch show We Know Where You Live. Along the way we’ll be revisiting the forgotten link between Rupert And The Frog Song and Cannibal Holocaust, speculating on how many hours of L!ve TV Richard Herring might have watched, and learning the terrible fate of The Sheep That Knew Too Much.

Find Mark’s previous appearance and more editions of Looks Unfamiliar at http://timworthington.org/

Looks Unfamiliar #31 Extra: “Les Tripodes”

You can find some extra chat with Mark on the subject of watching television on holiday, taking a look at ropey old American anthology series, French dubbed versions of The Professionals, and whatever NUTS! actually was, here.

You can find Mark’s previous appearance on Looks Unfamiliar here.

With fellow Looks Unfamiliar guest Emma Burnell (who you can hear on the show here), Mark is a regular contributor to the political debate podcast House Of Comments, which you can find out more about here or follow on Twitter at @HoCPodcast. You can also hear my guest appearance on House Of Comments on the Audio page here.

If you’ve enjoyed this, you’ll probably also enjoy Tim’s new book Can’t Help Thinking About Me, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.

THE BEST OF LOOKS UNFAMILIAR 02 - HE'S NOT ON A QUEST TO FIND OUT, HE'S JUST ON A QUEST TO GET OUT

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to.

This is a collection of highlights from shows seven to twelve, featuring Lisa Parker and Andrew Trowbridge on the Jaws game, Ben Baker on Mysteries Of Old Peking, Martin Ruddock on Doomlord, Steve O’Brien on High Time and Ice Cold Cube by The Stone Roses, Jem Roberts on an advert reuniting Neil and Vyvyan from The Young Ones, and Mark Griffiths on The Bloke Who Pulled His Pants Down On Kilroy. Along the way we’ll be finding out why nothing is scarier than a playing field in Slough, how to spot Simon Bates in disguise via a series of cryptic clues, and what musical genres ‘The Youngs Ones’ were followers of. Plus there’s also something you may not have heard before – Tim on the radio talking to Mark Thompson about the revival of The Prisoner, which everyone seems to have forgotten about already.

You can find more editions of Looks Unfamiliar here.

You can find an edition of Looks Unfamiliar with Ben talking to Tim about ITV nostalgia show Looks Familiar here, and another Looks Unfamiliar appearance by Ben here.

You can hear Tim making a guest appearance on Lisa and Andrew’s podcast Round The Archives, talking about Chigley and the end of ‘The Sixties’, here.

If you’d like to help support Looks Unfamiliar, why not get one of Tim’s books? There’s Not On Your Telly, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here. Or Well At Least It’s Free, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here. Or Top Of The Box, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here. Or even Can’t Help Thinking About Me, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.

THE BEST OF LOOKS UNFAMILIAR 01 - CAPTAIN PEACOCK IS POMPOUS, MOVE BACK THREE SPACES

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to.

This is a collection of highlights from the first six shows, featuring Stephen O’Brien on The Morecambe & Wise Game, Garreth F. Hirons on Food Fighters, Emma Burnell on The Patchwork Monkey, Phil Catterall on the ZX Spectrum tie-in game for Platoon, Mark Thompson on Night Shift, and Ben Baker on Fiendish Feet. Along the way we’ll be finding out when it’s appropriate to address Colin Bennett as ‘Vince Purity’, how many issues of ‘Razzle And Wise’ were published, and just which elements of The Untouchables were considered appropriate for a scrolling platform game aimed at children, not to mention recalling the classic horror film ‘Dracula Vs. The Skeleton’. Plus there’s also something you may not have heard before – Tim on the radio talking to Georgey Spanswick about ridiculous seventies board games.

You can find more editions of Looks Unfamiliar here.

You can also find a second appearance by Garreth here (as well as a Christmas mini-episode here), and another by Mark (with a bit of extra bonus chat) here. Garreth also took over as presenter for a special about comedy on BBC Radio 3 which you can find here. Emma’s second appearance – again with some extra bonus chatter – can be found here. Ben showed up for a second time here, and also for a special where we talked about ITV nostalgia show Looks Familiar, which you can find here. Stephen came back for a Christmas Special to talk about forgotten (and mostly awful) eighties Christmas Singles, which you can hear here.

You can find Stephen’s website here. Garreth’s podcast Retrospecticus – The Simpsons And Modern History Together At Last can be found here. Emma’s official website is here, and her podcast The Zeitgeist Tapes can be found here. You can find Phil on Twitter here, and Ben’s official website with details of his books is here. Mark is a regular contributor to the political debate podcast House Of Comments, which you can find out more about here.

The full version of the chat about seventies board games is on the Audio page.

If you’d like to help support Looks Unfamiliar, why not get one of Tim’s books? For starters there’s Well At Least It’s Free, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here. And then there’s Fun At One – The Story Of Comedy At BBC Radio 1, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here. Or even Can’t Help Thinking About Me, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.

003 - MARK THOMPSON - I'M QUITE HAPPY WITH MY PASSPORT COLOUR TO BE HONEST

Looks Unfamiliar is a podcast in which writer and occasional broadcaster Tim Worthington talks to a guest about some of the things that they remember that nobody else ever seems to.

Joining Tim this time is radio host and political pundit Mark Thompson, who’s wondering why nobody else he knows ever seems to have heard of computer-assisted action series Whiz KidsCrash ZX SpectrumMagazine and its legally contentious parodies of competitors, ITV Night Time filler Night Shift, Public Information Film family The Blunders, late nineties dystopian thriller The Last Train, and Hanna Barbera horror-adventure hybrid The Drak Pack. Along the way we’ll be finding out why there should be more government warnings about the dangers of hallucinating a disdainful Emma Bunton, how to distinguish an American teenager on a BMX from Arthur Mullard in a school cap, and when it’s appropriate to address Colin Bennett as ‘Vince Purity’.

You can find more editions of Looks Unfamiliar at http://timworthington.org/.

You can find another appearance by Mark on Looks Unfamiliar, with more about his late-night nineties viewing habits (and a hidden extra mini-edition), here.

You can find more recollections of ZX Spectrum games in other editions of Looks Unfamiliar with Emma Burnell on The Lords Of Midnight here, Garreth F. Hirons on Saboteur here and Frankie Goes To Hollywood here, Michael Livesley on Clumsy Colin Action Biker here, Phil Catterall on Platoon here, Stephen Brotherstone and Dave Lawrence on Deus Ex Machina here and Jem Roberts on Dizzy here.

Along with fellow Looks Unfamiliar guest Emma Burnell (who you can hear on Looks Unfamiliar here and here), Mark is a regular contributor to the political debate podcast House Of Comments, which you can find out more about here or follow on Twitter at @HoCPodcast. You can also hear my guest appearance on House Of Comments on the Audio page here.

There’s a huge feature on The Last Train, and the many other attempts by the BBC and ITV (and Channel 4, Channel 5 and even Sky One) at ‘doing’ sci-fi while Doctor Who was off the air, in Tim’s book Well At Least It’s Free, available in paperback here or from the Kindle Store here.

Mark also appears in The Best Of Looks Unfamiliar alongside Ben Baker, Emma Burnell, Phil Catterall, Stephen O’Brien and Garreth F. Hirons, which you can find here.